Three Things I Learned From My First Boxing Injury

After the class that kicked my mental ass, two fun things happened. 

First, I caught whatever my stomach bug my daughter had.  I'm sure all the parents reading this are shook.  Also, all the parents reading this, might just be my mom.... Hey mom. How you doin?

Second, pretty sure that I tweaked my left wrist doing a crappy job with the combos in that class. It wasn't swollen but it hurt enough that I had to ice it over a few days.  So that's like an injury right?  #RidiculousButImStillPublishingThisPost

As a veteran non-athletic person, here are three things I learned from way over thinking my first boxing injury. 

1. We have to take care of our hands. Jason Van said it best, "proper protection, proper technique is way more important than what gloves you choose. In other words, you have to build in the care and longevity of your hands.  These things are not smartphones or laptops. You can't upgrade them to the latest model. You can't replace them. You get what you get. You get this one set."   

My first takeaway is to do a good job with wraps and the gloves.  Almost immediately after starting boxing classes, I wanted to be able to wrap my hands myself.  Literally had just spent the week before trying to figure out how to put the gloves on without my teeth.  Which, expletive that. Now I'm gonna keep using my teeth for that second glove and getting it secure and lined up.  Those gloves are the protection for my wrists! 

Picture of a shirtless boxer with wraps and headgear. Says "proper protection, proper technique is way more important than what gloves you choose. In other words, you have to build in the care and longevity of your hands.  These things are not smartphones or laptops. You can't upgrade them to the latest model. You can't replace them. You get what you get. You get this one set. ~Jason Van"

2. Slow down on the mitts. Technique over speed, am I right? This is so humbling because I desperately want to be better and faster than I am.  

Between huffing and hitting the bag, its hard not to compare oneself to the other people in the class that have been coming for 1 year, maybe 3 years or some other unknown amount of time. {{Side eying myself right now.}} Even though I know that I'm much slower than some of the people that have been coming just a few weeks longer than me. Its not worth the risk of sloppy technique. 

The reality is that my brain is mush after doing the cardio warm up. Longer combinations with more than 6 shots and more than 1-2-3 punches are kinda hard for me to learn.  And if I'm gassed, I'm not spending much time actually practicing on the bag. 

In general, its just sloppy.  Like the other day I realized that the 3's (left hooks) should be at chin level on the bag and not in the premier-slug-bug/punch-buggy spot on that outside of one's shoulder.  

Until my skill improves, its okay to be slow.  And its okay to not compare myself to others. Especially since I bet none of them have kick-ass people like you reading their blogs.  

3. Its okay to miss a few days.  Ugh. Thank goodness for the stomach bug keeping me home.  I was trying to figure out how I could still go to the technique class and only use my right hand.  And I was terrified that if I skipped some classes that I would never go back. 

According the internet, rest days help prevent injuries.  Its hard to accept. But being out of commission due to an injury is much worse than a few extra rest days. 

When I got back the following week, it was like no one even noticed I was gone.  Cause honestly- I'm still trying to get to regular classes.  So it felt silly to have all this internal pressure built up about not missing a class. 

In closing, injuries are part of a sporty journey. Going a little slower/lighter, especially while learning is not going to destroy all our boxing hobbyist dreams. 

I'm curious- have you had sport injuries?  What have been the most important lessons that you've picked up from getting injured?     

  

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